Yarnaholics Anonymous

spring cleaning

Look at my shame. LOOK AT IT.

This is the story of how two well-meaning crafters came to terms with how they’re Yarnaholics. It’s a common story in the knitting/crochet community. A women buys her first skein of yarn and suddenly ten years have passed and her yarn stash has taken over an embarrassing large portion of her house. It has its own storage area in the basement and the office. It’s hidden inside the end tables in the living room. It’s squirreled away in clear plastic bins underneath the guest bed, and now her own bed too. The house is bursting at the seams, and she makes jokes with her husband about how he’ll be thanking her when the apocalypse comes and they’ll have plenty of yarn to make nets and sweaters and other post-apocalyptic essentials.

For Megan-Anne and I, yarn hording sprouted from necessity. There was a time when we exclusively knitted and crocheted items to sell at craft shows. We were coupon queens and bought one-pounders of acrylic yarn at the big box stores. We made blankets, socks, and a plethora of amigurumi and winter accessories. We had a blast and used the extra money to help pay for Megan-Anne’s premed program.

Then it occurred to me a few weeks ago, we haven’t attended a craft show (as a vendor) in nearly two years!

I went downstairs and stared into our storage area full of purple plastic bins. A couple of them held Geek-A-Long stuff and another housed our super secret project. The majority of them, however, contained yarn waiting to get turned into craft show wares. Even though I knew our circumstances wouldn’t change and there probably wouldn’t be time in 2016 either, I told myself we would do craft shows again next year. Like a true yarnaholic, I convinced myself we needed that yarn. Then, I went upstairs, made myself a cup of coffee, and tried to ignore the nagging feeling in the back of my mind.

The next morning, Megan-Anne and I went to our favorite diner to have a meeting over breakfast skillets and coffee. We were supposed to discuss sock designs and yarn, but it quickly dissolved into:

We need more space.

I don’t know if every designer or indie dyer dreams of the day they can buy a property to run their growing business out of, but I do. Almost every afternoon, as I get lost in answering a stream of emails about the Geek-A-Long, my mind wanders to how much easier it would be to launch our line of yarn if I didn’t have to climb over boxes of it just to get to my desk.

Umm… Did I mention Lattes & Llamas is developing a line of sock yarn? Yep, you heard right! Megan-Anne spilled the beans earlier than we’d planned. You can expect to see a formal announcement in the coming weeks, but here’s a sneak peek at our tonal primary colors:

Anyway, there we were, sitting in our usual booth, bickering about where to store our growing supply of Lattes & Llamas Vacation Yarn. Then the image of those purple bins popped into my mind and I blurted out that we were yarn hoarders.

Megan-Anne said, “We’re not yarn hoarders, Jac. We’re building a stock for the launch. It’s necessary.”

“I know. I’m talking about the craft show yarn.”

Megan-Anne looked at me sideways. “What about the craft show yarn?”

Then we ordered apple pie and had what Grandma Betty liked to call a “Come to God” talk. We discussed the reality of ever having time for craft shows again, and whether we would even want to use that yarn if the time came. Ultimately, we agreed to donate it to our local women’s shelter.

As knitters and crocheters, it’s easy to hoard yarn. Each skein is full of possibilities. You can hold it in your hands, rub it on your cheek, and think about what you could make with it. And the hardest part is knowing whether “could” actually means “will.”

If I’m being completely honest with you and myself, there were skeins of luxury yarn I should’ve added to the donation pile, but I couldn’t bring myself to part with them. I know I’ll never search the internet for someone selling the retired colorway I need. I know I only kept a few, because they were gifts, even though I hate the color or find it too scratchy.

Baby steps.

If your stash has gotten a little big and you’re ready to give spring cleaning a try, I highly recommend you donate the yarn to your local women’s shelter. During our Lent giveaway last year, Megan-Anne touched on the realities of domestic abuse shelters from the child’s perspective, but the same is to be said for the adults as well. They had to leave their lives behind, and what people forget is that usually means personal possessions as well. To combat this, Shelters try to provide activities in an attempt to rebuild normalcy and relieve stress. And as we yarnaholics know, a pair of knitting needles and a skein of yarn holds a lot of stress relief power. So, if you’re ready to purge a few skeins of yarn, give your local shelter a call. They’d love to put that yarn to good use.

~ Jac
“Every new beginning comes from some other beginnings end.” – Semisonic, Closing Time

2015 Geek-A-Long: Bunsen and Beaker

Week 12 Bunsen and Beaker (3)

Muppet Labs, where the future is being made today.

If I had it my way, the 2016 Geek-A-Long blanket would feature only Muppets. I’m not joking. I tried to convince Megan-Anne that it would be perfect for 2015, but she said it was too narrow of a scope for the GAL’s sophomore year. I humbly disagreed, but was ultimately overthrown as you can tell. She promised me that one day — in the very distant future, I’ll bet — we would do a Muppets GAL blanket.

I will have my day.

My deep love of the Muppets aside, (When I married Mr. Cappuccino, I walked down the aisle to a string quartet’s rendition of the Rainbow Connection.), we can’t have a Mad Scientist themed GAL blanket without Dr. Bunsen Honeydew and his assistant Beaker.

Week 12 Bunsen and Beaker (2)

The absence of Bunsen and Beaker in my Muppet Show chess set is an absolute travesty.

Dr. Bunsen Honeydew PHD is a scientist, inventor, and founder of Muppet Labs. His inventions have changed the way we live our lives today. I mean, when I wake up in the middle of the night and think, “Oh, goodness — gasp — is there a gorilla in here?” I know there isn’t, because I have a gorilla detector.

Bunsen also brought us such life altering inventions as the Magnetic Carrots, Edible Paperclips, Nuclear Shaver, and Elevator Shoes. He also spent time working at CERN with the Large Hadron Collider in 2011 with his assistant Beaker. And he passive aggressively graciously sent a congratulatory letter to the Mars Rover Mission team in 2004 when they beat him to landing on Mars.

Week 12 Bunsen and Beaker (4)

Of course, when speaking of Bunsen, we must also pay homage to his long-suffering assistant Beaker. The sweet and extremely anxious Beaker is often used as Muppet Labs very own lab rat. But, Beaker is more than a stream of meeps and comic mishaps. He’s also an artist. From an Ode to Joy to Bohemian Rhapsody and Ringing of the Bells, he shows us how much feeling one meep can convey.

Week 12 Bunsen and Beaker (1)
Whether you’re knitting, crocheting, or cross stitching this square, you can download the Bunsen and Beaker pattern here. Instructions for both knit and crochet are listed in the pattern. When you’re finished making it, don’t forget to tweet or instagram your squares at me @jac_attacking or Megan-Anne @Doctor_Llama with the hashtag #geekalong!

#roguedemonhunterkitty is always so "helpful" on photography days. #cats #geekalong #muppets #BunsenAndBeaker #lattesandllamas

A photo posted by Jacquline "Cappuccino" Rivera (@jac_attacking) on

If you’re having trouble with double-sided knitting, we have a how-to video here and a tutorial on crochet here. Want to hang out with other people making the blanket? You can find moral support in the Geek-A-Long group on Ravelry here.

~ Jac
“Now, Beaker, you forgot the beaker. Get the beaker, Beaker.”

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If you enjoyed this post, please consider making a donation to Child’s Play Charity. Here is a direct link to our donation page benefiting the charity. Please help us raise $1,000 this year! No contribution is too small.

2015 Geek-A-Long: The Flash

week 11 The Flash (1)

If you are not a big ol’ comic book geek like myself, you may not realize there are actually four Flashes: The Golden Age and original Flash, Jay Garrick; The Silver Age Flash, Barry Allen; and two Modern Age Flashes, Wally West and Bart Allen. Normally, I’m a Golden-Age-girl. But in this, and a few other select cases, I love one of the new heroes more. So this week, the Geek-A-Long honors Barry Allen, my favorite Flash and forensic scientist.

The Flash is one of my absolute favorite comics, and the Flash of Two Worlds is a crown jewel in my collection, second only to my copy of Supergirl’s introduction.

Coupled with the iconic Flash Logo, this week’s square depicts Barry’s origin story of being struck by lightening in his lab. One of the things I really like about Barry’s story-line is that he was a fan of the Golden Age Comics featuring Jay Garrick as The Flash, and after the accident that left him with super-speed he named himself after the original Flash.

week 11 The Flash (4)

This was one of the first squares we designed for this year, and I feel like it’s a really strong representative of GAL 2015. Oh, and have you guys been watching The Flash on the CW? If you’re not, give it a try. It has the quirkiness and humor of something based on a Golden/Silver Age hero, and I love Barry’s relationship with Oliver Queen (The Arrow). Plus, let’s face it, Grant Gustin is just crazy adorable.

week 11 The Flash (2)

Whether you’re knitting, crocheting, or cross stitching this square, you can download the The Flash pattern here. When you’re finished making it, don’t forget to tweet or instagram your squares at me @Doctor_Llama or Jac @jac_attacking with the hashtag #geekalong, so we can all oooh and ah at it together.

week 11 The Flash (3)

If you’re having trouble with double-sided knitting, we have a how-to video here, and if you would like to learn to crochet, Jac has a fabulous tutorial here.  You can find moral support in the Geek-A-Long group on Ravelry here.

~ Megan-Anne
I have GOT to get one of those STAR Labs shirts. 

P.S. Happy Birthday Jac!!!

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If you enjoyed this post, please consider making a donation to Child’s Play Charity. Here is a direct link to our donation page benefiting the charity. Please help us raise $1,000 this year! No contribution is too small.

Interview with Pam Powers

dress-to-impress knitted scarves

Back in January, Megan-Anne reviewed Pam Powers’ new book, Dress-to-Impress Knitted Scarves, when it hit the shelves. If you didn’t catch her review of the knitting pattern book, you can view it HERE. Needless to say, we both adored it. So much so that we asked Pam Powers to join us for an interview!

- – – Q & A with Pam Powers – – -

The fabulous Pam Powers

What drew you to knitting? 
I was taught to knit as a child by my grandmother, but never picked up needles again until about 10 years ago. I had wandered into my local yarn store and was amazed by how modern the designs were. I bought a copy of Rowan magazine, yarn and needles, and I was off to the races.

What is your favorite thing to listen to while knitting?
I usually knit at night, so I watch TV. Currently I’m watching the HBO series Girls and Togetherness, did a marathon of Sonic Highways last weekend. Sometimes I listen to audiobooks—I’m a big David Sedaris fan. Did I mention Downton Abbey?

Every designer we’ve spoken to has a different take on designing patterns. What is your process like?
I find my inspiration from fashion, so I spend a lot of time on the Internet. I try and design accessories that I think work well with clothing. I sketch a shape, sometimes make a prototype out of fabric, then find stitch patterns and make a swatch. I then write and / or chart the pattern and make the sample.

One of our favorite patterns from Dress-to-Impress Knitted Scarves was the Quilted Lattice Ascot. What is your favorite from the book?
It seems to keep changing. Right now, I’m stuck on Duchess Wrap.

Duchess Wrap by Pam Powers

Where did your love affair with ascots begin?
I live in Southern California, so there are not many times during the year you need to wear a long scarf or cowl wrapped around your neck. There have been occasions where I have been out wearing a double-wrapped infinity scarf and seen someone walk by in a tank top and shorts. Probably the appropriate outfit was somewhere in the middle, but we Californians don’t have a good grasp on how to dress for the weather.

The ascot is a great neckwear option because of the way it lies flat and you can tuck it inside the neck of your coat. Sometimes that’s all you need. Did I mention how quick it is to make?

Quilted Lattice Ascot by Pam Powers

Quilted Lattice Ascot

What’s next for Pam Powers? Any new and exciting projects on the horizon we should know about?
I am currently working on a couple new designs for spring, and then I will be putting a collection together for fall, and possibly an e-book.

Do you have any other hobbies besides knitting?
I wish I had time to do something else. Probably photography would be the closest thing I do to a hobby, but it’s mostly work-related.

And now for the fun questions. What is your favorite caffeinated beverage?
Hot soy latte.

If you could have any superpower, what would it be?
That’s easy—time travel. Sadly, I tend to dwell on my past mistakes, but I suppose that’s how we learn. It would be nice though, to go back and do things differently.

Thanks for including me in your fabulous blog!

- – – – – – 

Thank you for joining us, Pam! We loved having you and can’t wait to see what you put out this year.

Dress-to-Impress Knitted Scarves is on shelves now, and you just can’t go wrong with it. Whether you want a preppy cowl, girly bow, or funky western bandanna, there’s something in here to make you happy. You can find Pam Powers on her websiteFacebook, and Instagram.

~ Jacquline
Who doesn’t love Downton Abbey???

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Knits for Boys

Knits for Boys by Kate Oates

One of the greatest parts of my job is getting to fill my grabby-hands with new knitting books. I love books pretty much across the board, but knitting books are special. There’s just something about a brand new untapped wealth of stitch patterns, color charts, construction techniques, and shaping options that makes me feel all tingly with potential. So when Kate Oates kindly offered us a copy of her fabulous new book, Knits for Boys, I was all over it.

Plus, my friends keep having baby boys, and frankly, the universal scale of cute knits for baby girls vs. baby boys is woefully out of balance.

Library Cardigan by Kate Oates

Library Cardigan from Kate Oates’ “Knit for Boys”

Kate Oates, the fiber wizard behind Tot Toppers, outdid herself with this book. It was so refreshing to see patterns that were actually designed with real little boys in mind! Every pattern in it thoughtfully considered how it would really be worn, and not just how it would look in photographs. I think the Library Cardigan and the Long John Pjs are my favorites. Seriously guys, knit pajamas.

I could stop right here and you would be more than justified to run out right now to get a copy of “Knits for Boys.” But there’s more. Many of the patterns are designed with grow-with-me elements that allow for maximum wearability. The Library Cardigan is shown in the book on models who are five and seven years old. They are pictured wearing the same sweater. The design elements allow it to keep on fitting for years.

Look, we all have to knit for kids. Friends tell me they’re having a baby and in the back of my mind I start thinking:

Great. I’ll have to make that little nugget a sweater since I made so-and-so’s baby a sweater and I don’t want to seem unfair. I’ll spend 20+ hours knitting something that will fit the kid for about 20 days.

Don’t get me wrong. I love my friends and their kids, and I love being able to give them a special hand-made piece. I just don’t enjoy making sweaters that get worn once since kids grow so fast. “Knits for Boys” has an entire section with tips and tricks for making hand-knits fit as long as possible. Frankly, it’s totally changed the way I look at knitting for kids.

Speaking of knitting for kids, I had to take the patterns for a test drive right away.

Working on something special for a new human :D #knitting #knitsagram #KnitsForBoys

A photo posted by Dr. Megan-Anne Llama (@doctor_llama) on

I had some Mountain Meadow Wool on hand in Fern, which seemed just right for a little boy’s hat. It’s intended for a good friend’s baby boy, but Gambit was eyeing it so hard that I had to let him wear it. The hat will still find it’s way out to the little one, but the Great Gambino will miss it. ;)

Knits for Boys is on shelves now, so there’s no need to wait! You can also check out Kate’s work on Instagram, Ravelry, and the Tweetys.

~ Megan-Anne
It bothers me how good my cat is at Blue Steel.

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2015 Geek-A-Long: Indiana Jones

Indiana Jones 2

That belongs in a museum!

Nothing surprises Indiana Jones, he’s a scientist. Professor of Archaeology, expert on the occult, and how does one say it… obtainer of rare antiquities, Indiana Jones isn’t just another sexy man in a wide-brimmed fedora back-lit against the setting sun. He hates Nazis and snakes. And he knows that in the Latin alphabet, ‘Jehovah’ begins with an ‘I’.

Indiana Jones was the most talented bum Professor Abner Ravenwood ever trained. He also might’ve been named after the dog, but he had a lot of fond memories of that dog. Either way, Indy taught me that Archaeology is the search for fact, not truth. (If it’s truth you’re interested, Dr. Tyree’s philosophy class is right down the hall.) I also learned that when you lose, it doesn’t mean you have to like it and ‘X’ never, ever marks the spot.

Indiana Jones 1

Sidebar: Before I continue writing a post made almost purely out of quotes from the movies, I don’t want to hear any crybaby flak about Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull. If the thing you didn’t like about it was the alien, then you need to take off your nostalgia glasses and come to terms with how there is supernatural stuff in every single one of those movies. Harrison Ford was delightful as always (hope you’re healing up well after your crash Mr. Ford!) and I was pleased to see Karen Allen reprise her role as Marion Ravenwood. I love her character; she has moxie.

Super-Extra Sidebar: Megan-Anne and I saw Karen Allen speak about weaving at Vogue Knitting Live in New York a few years ago. It was very informative. And you know we have to support our fellow fiber enthusiasts. ;)

What I love about Professor Henry “Indiana” Jones Jr. is that no matter how many times he sees crazy stuff like the Ark of the Covenant melting Nazi faces or glowing Sankara stones, he remains a scientist. He continues to approach mythology and folklore from a scholarly perspective until he’s proven otherwise. Indy is also the perfect storm of kissable and smarts, and for that reason we had to memorialize his back-lit form in yarn.

Indiana Jones 3

Whether you’re knitting, crocheting, or cross stitching this square, you can download the Indiana Jones pattern here. Instructions for both knit and crochet are listed in the pattern. When you’re finished making it, don’t forget to tweet or instagram your squares at me @jac_attacking or Megan-Anne @Doctor_Llama with the hashtag #geekalong!

If you’re having trouble with double-sided knitting, we have a how-to video here and a tutorial on crochet here. Want to hang out with other people making the blanket? You can find moral support in the Geek-A-Long group on Ravelry here.

~ Jac
Fortune and glory, kid. Fortune and glory.

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If you enjoyed this post, please consider making a donation to Child’s Play Charity. Here is a direct link to our donation page benefiting the charity. Please help us raise $1,000 this year! No contribution is too small.

2015 Prize Baskets

DSCN3263

Lattes & Llamas is raffling off four prizes again this year to participants in the 2015 Geek-A-Long on Ravelry, and we feel as if it’s only right to include a little something from us. Before I tell you what we’re putting in the pot this year, here is a quick reminder to those of you just joining us:

To be eligible to win one of the three prize baskets, you must post a picture of your completed 2015 blanket to the Ravelry GAL group by January 31, 2016. The blanket must contain 24 of the 48 squares released in 2015, be joined, and edged. Just like last year, the fourth prize will be raffled off for just being a member of our Ravelry group. If you’re not a member, however, it isn’t too late to join and get in on the fun! You can find everything you’ll need to know about the Geek-A-Long on the FAQ page.

kniterary photo cover

Every hand-knit has a story behind it. These have whole books. ~ Kniterary by Lattes & Llamas.

DSCN3266

In addition to the recently released Kniterary eBook and the soon to be released Kniterary: Crochet Winter Accessories, Megan-Anne and I each made a special handmade item to add to the lottery pot. Megan-Anne made four identical sets of stitch makers and I sewed up four different notions pouches. Each notion pouch has a zipper, fleece lining, and measures 5 inches x 5.5 inches. We had a blast crafting them up for our future lucky winners.

As we add prizes to the GAL lottery this year, you can find them under the Geek-A-Long Benefactors tab at the top of the page, which also features the prizes from last year.

~ Jac
Um, you can’t be the Craft-Master, Megan-Anne. I’m older. I called dibs.

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2015 Geek-A-Long: The Magic School Bus

"Take chances, make mistakes, get messy." – Miss Frizzle #knitting #geekalong #lattesandllamas #magicschoolbus #MissFrizzle

A photo posted by Jacquline "Cappuccino" Rivera (@jac_attacking) on

This week we honor the incomparable Miss Frizzle with a Magic School Bus square. Miss Frizzle has been out there taking risks, making mistakes, and getting messy since I was a kid. Let’s all be honest with ourselves, if you grew up in the age of the Magic School Bus, you looked at your own field trip permission slip with uncontrolled derision at least once as a kid. Miss Frizzle could have taken you on a way better trip than you were going on.

Miss Frizzle may not know everything, but she comes pretty close. She’s one of those amazingly fearless, butt-kicking women that inspired me as a kid, and I hope will be an inspiration to my future children as well. When we picked out the 48 squares for 2015 we asked a few friends to weigh in on who, in their opinion, HAD to be on the blanket. Every single one of them cited The Frizz. Though I doubt Valerie Frizzle has ever sought the approval of anyone, that’s about as validating as it gets considering what a diverse group of friends we polled.

week 9 Miss Frizzle (2)

The original concept for the square was Miss Frizzle herself. More or less in the same style as the Dr. Venture Square. Ultimately though, it didn’t seem like it was really representing her. She’s not someone that would choose her own face to represent what she does. In the end, her magic school bus won out and I really like how it turned out.

week 9 Miss Frizzle (4)

Whether you’re knitting, crocheting, or cross stitching this square, you can download the Magic School Bus pattern here. When you’re finished making it, don’t forget to tweet or instagram your squares at me @Doctor_Llama or Jac @jac_attacking with the hashtag #geekalong, so we can all oooh and ah at it together.

week 9 Miss Frizzle (1)

If you’re having trouble with double-sided knitting, we have a how-to video here, and if you would like to learn to crochet, Jac has a fabulous tutorial here.  You can find moral support in the Geek-A-Long group on Ravelry here.

~ Megan-Anne
RIP Leonard Nimoy. I miss you already.

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If you enjoyed this post, please consider making a donation to Child’s Play Charity. Here is a direct link to our donation page benefiting the charity. Please help us raise $1,000 this year! No contribution is too small.

Kniterary eBook Release

kniterary photo cover

Every hand-knit has a story behind it. These have whole books.

Amelia Stole
This collection of unique hand knit garments and accessories were inspired by some of Literature’s greatest stories. Based on Nathaniel Hawthorn’s The Scarlet Letter, the Scarlet Letterman’s Jacket will keep you warm while telling the world you make your own rules. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes inspired the Shersocks, a fun color-work pattern for those that believe even their toes deserve to look like geniuses. J. M. Barrie’s Peter Pan was the inspiration for a quick and quirky necklace that never has to grow up. Based on HP Lovecraft’s Cthulu, the rich cabling on the HP LoveVest will feed your darker side. Finally, the Amelia Stole, based on Amelia Sedley from William Thackeray’s iconic Vanity Fair will make you feel like a high society lady, even if you are on a peasant’s budget.

$15.00

A PDF will be emailed to you by Ravelry. You don’t need to be a Ravelry member to order, but if you are, the PDF will show up in your library. If you are a member of Ravelry, you can view Kniterary here. Or you can purchase the eBook from the Lattes & Llamas Etsy store.

Shersocks Silver Pan HP LoveVest Scarlet Letterman

Megan-Anne and I have been talking about Kniterary for a long time, and it feels awesome to release this first volume of patterns. We’re more than a little obsessed with books in our family, so it’s no surprise that our first pattern compendium would be based on the classic literature we grew up with. All of the patterns were designed for the modern lady, who could wear these garments at work with a pencil skirt or with jeans for a casual night out.

~Jac
Knit night never looked so fabulous.

2015 Geek-A-Long: Rosalind Franklin

week 8 Rosalind Franklin (3)

Rosalind Franklin is one cool chick.

Chances are, when you think about DNA, you think about Watson and Crick. Don’t get me wrong, they are a part of the story, but the real science hero here is Rosalind Franklin. Born and educated in England, Rosalind excelled at everything she did: Sports, school, throwing shade. There was nothing this girl couldn’t do. She earned her PhD at the tender age of 25 and in 1947 she jetted off to Paris to study X-Ray Crystalography. Rosalind Franklin independently hypothesized the structure of DNA and was instrumental in informing the work that other scientists took credit for. *cough* WatsonAndCrick *cough*

Franklin is a four letter word in our family. We get super fired when we talk about her, and that fact prompted a long discussion about whether we could write this post without breaking the “no negativity” rule. Because guys, seriously, it’s insane how much she was robbed at the end of her life. A male colleague of Franklin’s showed HER work to Crick, which helped them form theories she already had, but they published first and only kind of acknowledged that she had anything to do with it.

week 8 Rosalind Franklin (2)

Though Watson and Crick ultimately credited her contributions, they weren’t publicizing it at the time. And the kicker? She died to bring us this research. All of her work with early X-Rays exposed her to so much radiation that she contracted Ovarian Cancer and died at only 37-years-old.

Oh, and wanna know what the bitterness-icing on this unfair-cake is? Watson and Crick won a Nobel Prize for their work, which was heavily influenced and informed by Franklin’s. It would be fair to say that without her work, theirs wouldn’t have existed. Rosalind Franklin was not nominated. Megan-Anne and a good friend of mine have spent some time in the Scientific Community and from the stories I’ve heard them tell, it still isn’t the easiest place to be a lady. To be fair, I hear it’s really hard to get your research done while crawling with icky girl cooties.

Anyhow, if Megan-Anne and I can educate even a few people about some of the amazing contributions that women scientists have made, we’ll consider it a win.

The inspiration for this square was the DNA Crystalograph X-Rays, taken by Rosalind Franklin, that proved the double helix and changed the way we look at DNA. Not included on this square, but definitely worth mentioning were Franklin’s work on the molecular makeup of viruses, including Polio. So if you don’t have polio, pour one out tonight for Rosalind Franklin. She deserves it.

week 8 Rosalind Franklin (1)

week 8 Rosalind Franklin (4)

Whether you’re knitting, crocheting, or cross stitching this square, you can download the Rosalind Franklin pattern here. Instructions for both knit and crochet are listed in the pattern. When you’re finished making it, don’t forget to tweet or instagram your squares at me @jac_attacking or Megan-Anne @Doctor_Llama with the hashtag #geekalong!

If you’re having trouble with double-sided knitting, we have a how-to video here and a tutorial on crochet here. Want to hang out with other people making the blanket? You can find moral support in the Geek-A-Long group on Ravelry here.

~ Jac
“If I could get hit points for loading gels, I would KILL this.” Megan-Anne regarding a certain D&D game.

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If you enjoyed this post, please consider making a donation to Child’s Play Charity. Here is a direct link to our donation page benefiting the charity. Please help us raise $1,000 this year! No contribution is too small.